Não Há Local Mais Apropriado
There’s No Better Place

The video shows the entrance to one of the Brazilian Senate restrooms. This one is located close to the Senate Library. The rolling video says: “Have you ever thought of a more appropriate place for campaign ads of a criminal like this one (Lula)? It’s either this way, close to the john, or in exchange for bologna sandwiches — which will invariably end in the toilet, too…”

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A Reforma Suja da Previdência – Meus 2 Centavos
The Dirty Welfare Reform – My 2 Cents

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In this video, I talk about the dirty tricks used by the administration in trying to hurry up approval of a murderous welfare reform. I explain with numbers why there is not a so-called “welfare deficit” and propose that the administration should do its homework before attempting to screw the Brazilian population with a terrible welfare reform.

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Como Funciona A Ameaça da Coréia do Norte
How The North Korean Threat Works

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In this video, a person explains how Kim Jong-un may destroy the whole world. If he wants to destroy just the United States of America, he presses the green button. If there is retaliation from the U.S. and other countries, he then presses the yellow button, which will destroy the whole world except for Brazil. Asked how to destroy Brazil, he then shows the red button with the number 13 (the Workers Party electoral number). Pressing that red button, then Brazil is completely destroyed, too. 😉

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A Horripilante Lista Fechada
The Horrifying Closed List

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This is a skit on the so-called “closed list”, a new dirty trick being proposed by Brazil’s corrupt politicians to perpetuate themselves in power. The waiter informs the client at the restaurant that they no longer have a menu. The client chooses a restaurant, but the food is supplied by the owner regardless of the client’s taste. Linking it or not, the client has to pay for the food. And it doesn’t matter if the person gives up eating at a restaurant and now wants to eat at home — he/she will have to keep paying a fee to support the restaurants. It is a similar situation to what happens nowadays in Brazil’s politics.

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Antes… e Agora
Then… and Now

The days used to be like this… nowadays, they are like this.

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Fim de Linha
End of the Line

•The first inquiry is about payments of bribes to the criminal organization headed by Lula da Silva.
•The second inquiry deals with payments of bribes disguised as fraudulent lectures, reform/upgrade of the Atibaia home and the acquisition of a building where the Lula Institute is located.
•The third inquiry deals with the 4 million reais sent to the Lula Institute by the Odebrecht’s Bribe Department.
•The fourth inquiry deals with payment of bribes to Frei Chico, Lula’s brother.
•The fifth inquiry is about Lula’s work as Odebrecht’s lobbyist, dealing with Dilma Rousseff. He tried to benefit Odebrecht in the construction of Jirau hydroelectric plant.
•The sixth inquiry deals with payment of bribe to the Haddad campaign and payment to Joao Santana in exchange for “legislative measures” favorable to Odebrecht.
•The seventh inquiry is about the robbery against Sete Brasil (a company) with a 1% “toll” of bribes on top of all contracts to irrigate the Workers Party finances.
•The eighth inquiry deals with the Car Wash (Lava Jato) obstruction attempts through the approval of MP 703.
•The ninth inquiry is about the 3 million reais paid to Carta Capital magazine by the Odebrecht’s Bribe Department.
•What now, Lula? Emilio Odebrecht has told the authorities that the payment of lectures was a disguise for bribes.

(Fonte/Source: VemPraRua.net)

 

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O Sinal Mais Visível da Corrupção no Brasil
Brazil’s Most Visible Sign of Corruption

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In this video, a Brazilian who lives in Florida shows how much he pays for licensing his Maseratti anually, something a little less than 100 dollars. In Brazil, the same car would require an annual extorsion by the un-government/un-administration of about 9 thousand 500 dollars. Viewers beware: he uses some rough language in Brazilian Portuguese — because he is understandably pretty mad about it.

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